Researching the County Home

Postcard, ca 1935, New London County Temporary Home, Norwich Connecticut
Postcard, ca 1935, New London County Temporary Home, Norwich Connecticut

In 1935, at the age of ten, Mom was sent to live the New London County Temporary Home. Grandma had been committed to Norwich State Hospital and Grandpa was not considered suitable for raising Mom on her own. When writing my family story, I couldn’t find much about this institution which she always referred to as “the county home.”

Fortunately, there is now a resource for genealogists who want to know more about their ancestors who were residents of the New London County Temporary Home. Cheryl and Chris Klemmer have compiled their research about the county home in the form of a reference book available at the Connecticut State Library in Hartford and the Otis Library in Norwich. New London County Temporary Home: History, Residents and References contains a history of home and the names of residents that were found in records. While they are not selling their book, Cheryl and Chris are willing to provide guidance about searching for former county home residents if you contact them at CTCountyHomes@gmail.com.

Family Myth Busting – Virtual Talk

Genealogical Tree, published by Daughaday & Becker, Philadelphia, ca. 1859. From the Library of Congress, LC-DIG-pga-01537.
Genealogical Tree, published by Daughaday & Becker, Philadelphia, ca. 1859. From the Library of Congress, LC-DIG-pga-01537.

On May 9th, I gave a virtual talk for the Enoch Pratt Free Library called, “Family Myth Busting.”  In it, I traced the steps I took to resolve the discrepancies in the stories my mother had always told me about her family. I share my strategies, in which I used maps, newspapers, and patient records from Norwich State Hospital to stitch together a narrative of my family story which was more connected than the one my mother told.  I also share my thoughts on the benefits of knowing one’s family history and how it has the potential to empower and to heal old wounds.

A recording of the talk is available through the Crowdcast platform at  https://www.crowdcast.io/e/virtual-genealogy-circle, or on Facebook at  https://www.facebook.com/theprattlibrary/videos/286558142501891.

Norwich State Hospital and My Family, Part 7: Family Secrets

Grandma Beatrice, ca. 1944
Grandma Beatrice, ca. 1944

[This is Part 7, the last of a series on Norwich State Hospital and its effect on my family. To start at the beginning, go to Part 1.]

In 1931, the delicatessen failed. Mom always said that it had failed due to the Great Depression, but Beatrice’s patient record from Norwich State Hospital told a different story.

Beatrice told the hospital social workers that while she was living with her aunt’s family,  her uncle by marriage forced her into a sexual relationship. She claimed, “He said it was nothing as we were relations and I felt it was the only way out.” Continue reading Norwich State Hospital and My Family, Part 7: Family Secrets

Norwich State Hospital and My Family, Part 6: Beatrice’s Story

Azilda Davignon Bonneau was my great-great-grandmother. In this studio portrait taken circa 1911, she is accompanied by two of her grandchildren. On the left is my grandmother Beatrice; on the right is her younger sister, Dinorah.
Azilda Bonneau, ca. 1911. On the left is my grandmother Beatrice; on the right is her younger sister, Dinorah.

[This is Part 6 of a series on Norwich State Hospital and its effect on my family. To start at the beginning, go to Part 1.]

Until I pieced together the family history through genealogy and patient records from Norwich State Hospital, I never knew how unsettled my grandmother Beatrice’s childhood had been. She spent her early years in poverty, with a mentally ill mother. She was seven years old when Graziella, was committed to Norwich State Hospital. Her father, Philippe, vanished after her mother died at the hospital in December of 1910. Beatrice was then raised by her grandparents, Azilda and Pierre Bonneau. But the losses kept coming.

Continue reading Norwich State Hospital and My Family, Part 6: Beatrice’s Story

Norwich State Hospital and My Family, Part 5: Graziella’s Demise

Postcard detail, Norwich State Hospital, ca. 1909.
Postcard detail, Norwich State Hospital, ca. 1909.

[This is Part 5 of a series on Norwich State Hospital and its effect on my family. To start at the beginning, go to Part 1.]

After the incident in which she threw her dentures down the toilet, Graziella’s condition steadily declined. The notations in her record appeared less frequently after that, sometimes months apart. It seemed that the hospital staff had given up on her. In March of 1910, she was transferred to a ward for disturbed patients, in a building called North D which was later renamed Dix.

North D, Norwich State Hospital. Image from the 1931 appraisal of Norwich State Hospital. Courtesy of Preston Historical Society
North D, Norwich State Hospital. Image from the 1931 appraisal of Norwich State Hospital. Courtesy of Preston Historical Society

Continue reading Norwich State Hospital and My Family, Part 5: Graziella’s Demise

Norwich State Hospital and My Family, Part 4: Graziella’s Teeth

North B, Norwich State Hospital. Image from the 1931 appraisal of Norwich State Hospital. Courtesy of Preston Historical Society
North B, Norwich State Hospital. Image from the 1931 appraisal of Norwich State Hospital. Courtesy of Preston Historical Society

[This is Part 4 of a series on Norwich State Hospital and its effect on my family. To start at the beginning, go to Part 1.]

After her admission to Norwich State Hospital, my great-grandmother, Graziella, was sent to North B. The patient population around the time she was admitted was 434, which may not seem like much now, but the existing buildings were only designed to hold 400. Over the years, although more wards were built, Norwich State Hospital was always said to be overcrowded. They just couldn’t keep up with the growing number of mentally ill patients. Continue reading Norwich State Hospital and My Family, Part 4: Graziella’s Teeth

Norwich State Hospital and My Family, Part 3: Madness Unfolding

[This is Part 3 of a series on Norwich State Hospital and its effect on my family. To start at the beginning, go to Part 1.]

My great-great-grandparents, Pierre and Azilda Bonneau, were French-Canadians who left Quebec in the late 19th century and settled in Danielson, Connecticut.  Their daughter, Graziella Bonneau, married Philippe Metthe in 1899.

According to the 1900 U. S. census, Philippe and Graziella were mill workers, probably at the Quinebaug Mill. They had their first child in 1901 — my grandmother, Beatrice. For the next several years, Graziella gave birth every 18 months. She stayed home with the children while Philippe continued to work in the mill.  Philippe & Graziella were so poor that by 1906, they were living in a shed behind her parents’ house — just like Mom had told me. Continue reading Norwich State Hospital and My Family, Part 3: Madness Unfolding

Norwich State Hospital and My Family, Part 2: What I Found

[This is Part 2 of a series on Norwich State Hospital and its effect on my family. To start at the beginning, go to Part 1.]

In 2012, at age 87, my mother was moved into assisted living. The unit was too small to accommodate her genealogy research, which was stored in several boxes full of binders and file folders, pedigree charts and census sheets, certificates and photographs, books and magazine articles. So, all of that came to my house. I stored it all in my basement, intending to hang on to it until someone else in my family expressed an interest in genealogy. But the librarian in me couldn’t resist peeking into the boxes and organizing what was there. I didn’t know at the time that I was on a slippery slope from being a reluctant genealogist to a relentless family historian. Continue reading Norwich State Hospital and My Family, Part 2: What I Found

Norwich State Hospital and My Family, Part 1: Backstory

Norwich State Hospital, Administration Building, October 2013
Norwich State Hospital, Administration Building, October 2013

Before I knew anything about my family’s ties to Norwich State Hospital, all I had were the brief stories Mom told me about her family.  To understand why I became obsessed with uncovering the family secrets, you have to understand how frustrated I was for most of my life with the lack of details about the family’s past.  It starts with where my mother came from. Continue reading Norwich State Hospital and My Family, Part 1: Backstory

Julianne Mangin at Otis Library, Norwich CT

I am pleased to have been asked to speak about my research at the Otis Library in Norwich, Connecticut.  The talk will take place on Monday, October 28, 2019 at 6:00 p.m.  Follow the link below for more details.

http://www.otislibrarynorwich.org/upcoming-events/2019/10/28/family-historian-julianne-mangin

I regret that I have not been posting new material on this blog in the past few months.  Developing this talk has taken up much of my writing time.  In addition, I gave my first talk on my historical research into Aspin Hill Memorial Park, a.k.a Aspin Hill Pet Cemetery earlier this month.  You can learn about this project at my other blog, Pet Cemetery Stories.

I hope to get back to blogging after I have delivered my talk at Norwich at the end of this month.  Thanks for staying with me, and I hope some of my subscribers will be able to come hear me.