Norwich State Hospital and My Family, Part 1: Backstory

Norwich State Hospital, Administration Building, October 2013
Norwich State Hospital, Administration Building, October 2013

Before I knew anything about my family’s ties to Norwich State Hospital, all I had was the brief stories Mom told me about her family.  To understand why I became obsessed with uncovering the family secrets, you have to understand how frustrated I was for most of my life with the lack of details about the family’s past.  It starts with where my mother came from. Continue reading Norwich State Hospital and My Family, Part 1: Backstory

Julianne Mangin at Otis Library, Norwich CT

I am pleased to have been asked to speak about my research at the Otis Library in Norwich, Connecticut.  The talk will take place on Monday, October 28, 2019 at 6:00 p.m.  Follow the link below for more details.

http://www.otislibrarynorwich.org/upcoming-events/2019/10/28/family-historian-julianne-mangin

I regret that I have not been posting new material on this blog in the past few months.  Developing this talk has taken up much of my writing time.  In addition, I gave my first talk on my historical research into Aspin Hill Memorial Park, a.k.a Aspin Hill Pet Cemetery earlier this month.  You can learn about this project at my other blog, Pet Cemetery Stories.

I hope to get back to blogging after I have delivered my talk at Norwich at the end of this month.  Thanks for staying with me, and I hope some of my subscribers will be able to come hear me.

Genealogy Gems Podcast

This is just a quick post to let everyone know that I was recently interviewed by Lisa Louise Cooke, of the Genealogy Gems podcast.

Here’s the link:  https://lisalouisecooke.com/2019/07/17/genealogy-gems-podcast-episode-231/

We talked about the research behind my three-part blog series on my great-aunt Alice.  We also discussed my other blog, Pet Cemetery Stories and my efforts to find all the human buried at Aspin Hill.

It was my second appearance on the Genealogy Gems podcast, the first having occurred last year.

Lisa Louise Cooke is more than just a podcast host.  She is an acclaimed expert in genealogy who travels extensively to teach research techniques at conferences, libraries, historical societies, etc.  I consider it an honor to be asked to appear on her podcast more than once.

Alice’s Story, Part 3: Final Resting Place

Exeter School Cemetery, Exeter, Rhode Island. October 2012
Exeter School Cemetery, Exeter, Rhode Island. October 2012

In Alice’s Story Part 2, I wrote about the Exeter School, formerly known as the Rhode Island School for the Feeble-Minded, where Alice spent the last twenty years of her life.  In this final installment, I conclude the story which began in Alice’s Story Part 1.

When I think of my great-aunt Alice Tillotson’s story, I feel sad for her. She was abandoned at a state institution and forgotten by her family. But was she? Surely my grandfather, not yet ten years old when she was taken away, must have missed his sister and childhood companion. When Grandpa showed Mom, then only eight years old, the photograph of Alice, it might have been around the time she died in 1933. Perhaps he heard of her death somehow, and was motivated to find the photograph of the two of them together. If that is the case, then I think he never forgot his sister, and her death filled him with sadness and regret. Continue reading Alice’s Story, Part 3: Final Resting Place

Alice’s Story, Part 2: The Exeter School

Exeter School, Superintendent's House and Administration. Rhode Island School for the Feeble-Minded in Exeter. Report. Providence: 1910.
Exeter School, Superintendent’s House and Administration. Rhode Island School for the Feeble-Minded in Exeter. Report. Providence: 1910.

In Part 1 of Alice’s story, I wrote about my great-aunt Alice Tillotson, who was a teenager when she was dropped off at the Oaklawn School for Girls around 1902.  After she turned 21, she was transferred to the State Alms House.  In 1913, she was admitted to the Rhode Island School for the Feeble-Minded in Exeter, Rhode Island.  It was there that she spent the rest of her life. Continue reading Alice’s Story, Part 2: The Exeter School

Alice’s Story, Part 1

Oaklawn School for Girls, ca. 1901. Board of State Charities and Corrections. Annual Report, 1901. Rhode Island State Archives. https://catalog.sos.ri.gov/repositories/2/digital_objects/378 Accessed May 10, 2019.
Oaklawn School for Girls, ca. 1901. Board of State Charities and Corrections. Annual Report, 1901. Rhode Island State Archives. https://catalog.sos.ri.gov/repositories/2/digital_objects/378 Accessed May 10, 2019.

Mom was a young girl of eight or nine when she first heard about her aunt Alice Tillotson. (This would have been about 1933.)  Grandpa was looking at a photograph from his childhood, in which he was six years old and standing next to his sister, Alice, who was about fifteen. Mom asked her father why she had never met his sister, and Grandpa replied that Alice had been put in an institution for the “feeble-minded” many years earlier. In 2012, when I began researching mom’s family tree, I came across my great-aunt Alice and was touched by her sad story. Continue reading Alice’s Story, Part 1

The Allure of Cemeteries: Introduction

St. James Cemetery, Danielson, Connecticut. November 2016
St. James Cemetery, Danielson, Connecticut. November 2016

At first it was dead ancestors that drew me to cemeteries. Once I started researching my family history, I began to feel connected to them through their stories. I was particularly interested in mother’s family, who emigrated from Quebec to New England in the late 19th century. My curiosity was piqued by the high incidence of mental illness and institutionalization among the women in the family. I was even fascinated by the occasional bad behavior of certain relatives. I visited my first ancestral graves not long after I began work on the family history in 2012. Continue reading The Allure of Cemeteries: Introduction

Rosalie Lapointe: My Brick Wall

Rosalie Lapointe Metthe
Rosalie Lapointe Metthe (185? – 1923)

Every genealogist has one; a brick wall in their research through which they are unable to break. Mine is my great-great-grandmother, Rosalie Lapointe. I have come to the conclusion that she did not want people to know where she came from, so she made sure to cover her tracks.
Continue reading Rosalie Lapointe: My Brick Wall

Norwich State Hospital: Book Review

 

Book cover: Norwich State Hospital, by Christine Rockledge. Introduction by Steve DePolito. Arcadia, 2018. Images of America series.
Book cover: Norwich State Hospital, by Christine Rockledge. Introduction by Steve DePolito. Arcadia, 2018. Images of America series.

Norwich State Hospital, by Christine Rockledge. Introduction by Steve DePolito. Mt. Pleasant: SC: Arcadia Publishing, 2018. Images of America series.

I was happy to see this book come out because I have spent the last six years researching Norwich State Hospital from a different angle than this author did. Four of my ancestors were patients there. Using their records (which I acquired from the Connecticut State Library) and supplementing them with historical background, I have tried to show what life was like for my family members during the years 1908-1958. Although my research didn’t take me into Norwich State Hospital’s more recent history, I can say that what is in this book about the first fifty years of the hospital is congruent with what I found in my own research. Continue reading Norwich State Hospital: Book Review

New London County Temporary Home

Postcard, ca 1935, New London County Temporary Home, Norwich Connecticut
Postcard, ca 1935, New London County Temporary Home, Norwich Connecticut

In 1935, when my mother was ten years old, she was taken from her parents and placed in what she called “the county home.” Its full name was the New London County Temporary Home, a facility for neglected and uncared for children. The county home was not an orphanage, because the goal was not to put the children up for adoption, but to eventually return them to their own families. In Mom’s case, she had been taken away from her parents because her mother had been admitted to Norwich State Hospital and her father was deemed physically and mentally unfit to raise her on his own. Continue reading New London County Temporary Home